Tuesday Tips: Benefits of a Four Day Homeschool Week!

Where We Started

We have found that having a four-day homeschool week for our elementary and middle grades children was very beneficial. The first year I homeschooled, I had planned on a five-day week.

This worked great for the first few weeks, but then we found the other homeschoolers in our area, and suddenly there were field trip opportunities, library activities, and more. Add in doctor’s appointments and other activities, and it felt like we were never getting in a full five days.
At first, this bothered the planner inside of me. I didn’t like feeling behind, even if it was a schedule of my creation. I also really wanted us to enjoy these fantastic opportunities that afforded so much learning, even if it wasn’t checking any of my pretty little boxes.

What I Changed


So, I changed everything up and went to a four-day school week. On paper, I planned school Monday through Thursday, and this left Friday for field trips, free play, and housekeeping. However, I kept it really flexible, and we could take off whatever day of the week we needed if there was another activity.


My elementary and middle-grade students generally only needed a few hours in the morning to finish their work, so fitting it all into four days was not challenging, and they were still finished by lunchtime or early afternoon each day.


Having that built-in day for field trips and housekeeping really took a lot of stress out of our homeschool. Another benefit is that my children were motivated to get their work done because they enjoyed the extra day off and knew that if they didn’t do their assignments because they had not been diligent, they would have to finish them on that fifth day.

Make It Your Own


Every family is unique, but creating a schedule with built-in flexibility can help you relieve the stress of not getting to all the lesson plans, allow more time for real-life learning and field trips, and motivate your children to get their work done in a timely fashion.
As my children have gotten older and started high school-level courses, they have drifted back towards a five-day week just because their courses take more time.

However, we still have weeks where they fit five days of material into four days so they can join the family on a field trip or do some other activity.
If you are feeling overwhelmed trying to fit it all in or if adding in field trips and other opportunities messes up your carefully written plans, don’t be afraid to change your schedule to provide that built-in flexibility.

It might be a four-day week or some other nontraditional option, but find what works for you and your family! I would love for you to share your flexible homeschooling schedule in the comments to give other families some ideas.

Resource Library and Affiliate Disclosure

When you sign up for the Schoolin’ Swag free resource library, you will get a link and password to the library; we are adding to the library each month with new items. You will also get a bi-weekly newsletter email to keep you updated on what we have going on.

Resource Library 

This post may contain affiliate or referral links, including Amazon affiliate links. As always, I will never recommend a product I don’t believe in, and you will never be charged more for purchasing through our links. It does help pay for the costs associated with the blog.

Deals and Freebies

If you have not tried SchoolhouseTeachers.com, you don’t want to miss this BOGO sale!!

Tuesday Tips: The Hidden Benefits of eBooks and Kindle Unlimited

*Some links are affiliate links, see disclosure below*

This tip is a little different from most of my recommendations because it focuses more on the homeschooling mom than homeschooling in general. However, I think it has benefits for both.
First, let me be transparent: I fought against eBooks for years, and to this day, I still love a good physical book. I have a stack on my bedside table and a bookshelf in every room except the bathrooms.

A Little Background


As a child, I read voraciously; I stayed up late, spent my free time reading, reading in the car, etc. I have fond memories of my high school years of hanging out with my friends at the bookstore with a cappuccino and a book.


Fast forward a few years, I was in the thick of motherhood, and I felt like I had no free time, and any time I did spend reading was parenting and later homeschooling books. While those were beneficial, I was losing out on the joy of reading for pleasure.


Several years ago, I started trying to intentionally add more pleasure reading to my book lists. I knew this would be beneficial for me and also for my children. I want my children to be readers, to love reading, and to choose to read. If I want that for them, I need to model that behavior. I added some fun fiction to my summer reading and eventually kept it going throughout the year.


That was beneficial, but I still wasn’t getting as much reading done as I had hoped. I am still a busy work-from-home, homeschool mom who doesn’t have much free time. I often wanted to read at night after everyone was in bed, but the lamp would keep my husband awake.

My Discovery


This was when I discovered the benefits of reading on my phone. I could read at night without keeping my husband up, I had my book with me wherever I went, so I could sneak in five or ten minutes of reading while waiting in line or at the doctor’s office. Before, I would scroll through social media during those times, but I felt like reading was a better use of my time. It helped me achieve my goals and find my reading joy again.

How Does Kindle Unlimited Fit Into This?


You may wonder why Kindle Unlimited is integral to this process for me. You can take advantage of reading on your phone without Kindle Unlimited, but it was a key component for me. It meant that there were always new books waiting for me; I could read from a wide variety of genres and books and easily switch back and forth between informative and fictional books depending on my mood that day. Am I the only one that has multiple books going at once?


For a low and easy-to-budget amount each month, I had access to what felt like unlimited book options. I was also able to use it with my children. We got books for their curriculums and more pleasure books for them to read. Like me, they still adore real books, but we found that when riding in the car, traveling, etc., the kindles are super convenient.


Recently, our subscription allowed my two teenagers and me to read the same book together and then discuss it without purchasing three copies of the same book or waiting until we had time to pass it around to each other.

Conclusions


I feel like our Kindle Unlimited subscription has helped me to read many more books than I otherwise would have read and reclaim lots of waits and riding time. (Bonus, I now get car sick when I read regular books while we ride, but I can read eBooks without a problem.)


I encourage you to check out the free trial and see if it can help you get in more reading time and share more books with your children and teens.


I would also love to hear from you what other strategies you employ to help you get more reading done.

Resource Library and Affiliate Disclosure

When you sign up for the Schoolin’ Swag free resource library you will get a link and password to the library, we are adding to the library each month with new items. You will also get a bi-weekly newsletter email to keep you up to date on what we have going on.

Resource Library 

This post may contain affiliate or referral links, including Amazon affiliate links. As always I will never recommend a product that I don’t believe in and you will never be charged more for purchasing through our links. It does help pay for the costs associated with the blog.

Tuesday Tips: Choosing Curriculum “What is Best For Me, Might Not Be Best For Thee”

I love helping families transition to homeschooling, and I could talk about curriculum for hours. As a mom who has been homeschooling for ten years, runs an online book store, and reviews curriculum, I have seen and tried a lot of different programs.

Almost always, one of the first questions people ask me when they decide to transition to homeschooling is, “which curriculum is the best?”

Sometimes I wish this was an easy cut and dried answer. However, what works best for your family (and sometimes each child) will vary based on many factors. My motto when dealing with curriculum is, “What is Best For Me, Might Not Be Best For Thee.”

Choosing Homeschool Curriculum

When deciding on the right curriculum, you must consider various factors.

Questions to Consider When Choosing Curriculum:

  • What are the goals of my homeschool?
  • How much parental input is needed/desired?
  • What are the learning styles of my children?
  • What is my budget?
  • Does this align with our family values?
  • How much time will this program take?
  • Is the program paper/pencil or computer-based?
  • Will I need additional materials?

How Do I Decide?

Now that we have established that there is no one size fits all solution to homeschool curriculum, you might be feeling more lost than ever and wondering if you will ever find the right fit. This news should be freeing. You can choose, and there is not necessarily a right or wrong answer.

Too often, parents feel like they are failing when a popular curriculum is not working for their child. Other times, parents feel frozen in indecision because they are unsure if the curriculum they are looking at is “best.”

My advice is to talk to people you know and look at reviews, but also make sure you look at each program through the lens of the questions listed above. Then choose the one (or ones) that you think will work best for your family.

Try the curriculum for a while and if it works, keep doing it. If it isn’t working, do not be afraid to sell that one and try something new. It may take a couple of tries to find the right fit. You are not alone, and that is not a failure.

Other Curriculum Resources:

Remember, you can’t do everything, and just because it is a good program does not mean it is suitable for your family! Find out more about that in my post about getting rid of our Latin curriculum.

You can also learn more about picking a curriculum and see our curriculum reviews using the links below!

New Years Curriculum Reevaluation and Nature Study

Changing Up Curriculum Without Overspending!

High School Credit for Morning Time Studies

Reviews

Resource Library and Affiliate Disclosure

When you sign up for the Schoolin’ Swag free resource library you will get a link and password to the library, we are adding to the library each month with new items. You will also get a bi-weekly newsletter email to keep you up to date on what we have going on.

Resource Library 

This post may contain affiliate or referral links, including Amazon affiliate links. As always I will never recommend a product that I don’t believe in and you will never be charged more for purchasing through our links. It does help pay for the costs associated with the blog.

Deals and Freebies

Not Consumed is having their annual Back to School Sale! (They have great family Bible studies)

$10 Off for Amazon Prime Day

Pre-Order the Brand New Tuttle Twins American History book for a big discount and some awesome bonuses.

Try Journey Homeschool Academy’s FUN and Free summer courses this week! Check out the Stargazing Astronomy Course and the Backyard Bugs course.

Also, check out the FREE Unlocking the Bible course for teens!

Also, get a 15% discount on Thinkwell Math by using this referral link.

Tuesday Tips: Prioritize Encouragement for Mom

*Some links are affiliate links, see disclosure below*

I genuinely believe that homeschooling is one of the most important tasks that God has given me, and I am so grateful for the opportunity. However, I also want to be honest and say that some days (months, years) are hard! In the day-to-day grind, it is easy to forget that we do not “have” to homeschool, but instead, we are privileged to have the opportunity to homeschool.

One way to help combat the hard days is to ensure that you include some homeschool mom encouragement in your days.

What is Homeschool Mom Encouragement?

There are so many different ways to be encouraged as a homeschool mom. Different things will work better for different families, different issues, and even just different seasons.

Remember the Why!

First, remember why you homeschool! I highly encourage you to write down your whys and keep them somewhere that you can refer back to them on the hard days! They will help keep you grounded and focused.

Community

Next, find a group of homeschool mom friends. I firmly believe that we should have a variety of friends, but sometimes you need another homeschool mom who has been there, done that, and come out on the other side.

I am blessed to have a large community of homeschool mom friends. Locally, I have friends that go out to dinner once a month for Mom’s Night Out and other friends who gather for park play dates and field trips. I am also a member of many great homeschool communities online, where people can ask questions, share ideas, and find support.

Not many tough homeschooling days aren’t made better with chocolate and an understanding friend!

Books, Podcasts, and Movies

Finally, many great books, podcasts, and even movies are geared toward encouraging homeschool moms. Your first thought is probably not how to find these resources but how to make time for them in your busy schedule.

You do not have to spend hours a day or even hours a week reading or listening, but I encourage you to find some time each week to read or listen to something encouraging. You might listen to a podcast while you wash dishes or take a walk or read for five or ten minutes before bed each night. Audiobooks can be a great way to listen while driving from place to place.

Taking that time to get encouragement will pay dividends in the long run. Having a refreshed spirit will give you the strength to work through the tough days and enjoy the good days!

I would love for you to share your ideas for homeschool mom encouragement, and I have included some links and resources to help get you started.

Encouraging Books

Awaking Wonder

Lifegiving Collection (Encouragement for moms)

Adventuring Together

Read Aloud Family

Pocketful of Pinecones ( A bit idyllic but a light encouraging read)

Encouraging Podcasts

At Home with Sally

Read-Aloud Revival

Resource Library and Affiliate Disclosure

When you sign up for the Schoolin’ Swag free resource library you will get a link and password to the library, we are adding to the library each month with new items. You will also get a bi-weekly newsletter email to keep you up to date on what we have going on.

Resource Library 

This post may contain affiliate or referral links, including Amazon affiliate links. As always I will never recommend a product that I don’t believe in and you will never be charged more for purchasing through our links. It does help pay for the costs associated with the blog.

Deals and Freebies

If you have not tried SchoolhouseTeachers.com, you don’t want to miss this sale!\

Journey Homeschool Academy’s FUN and Free summer courses start this week! Check out the Stargazing Astronomy Course and the Backyard Bugs course.

Also, check out the FREE Unlocking the Bible course for teens!

LAST Day for 10% off All About Learning with code BUYEARLY

Pre-Order the Brand New Tuttle Twins American History book for a big discount and some awesome bonuses.

Tuesday Tips: Testing Does Not Have to Be Stressful or Scary!

This post is not to debate the merits of standardized testing. Some folks choose to test because they like the feedback, some decide not to test, and others test to meet state testing requirements. The pros and cons of those decisions vary by family and are a discussion for a different day.

Today I want to talk about ways to keep testing from becoming stressful and scary. We don’t want our children stressed out, and we also know that having them stressed out can often cause them not to perform to the best of their abilities.

Do Not Make Testing High Stakes

Excluding state requirements, these standardized tests should not be high stakes for our students. Do not pass or fail a student based on a single piece of information. As homeschool parents, we know far more about what our students have mastered than any one test can show. Have them do their best, certainly look at the results and use them to help inform your instruction, but they do not need to feel like their success or failure all rides on a test.

Discuss Discuss Discuss

While you cannot discuss the actual questions or content of the test, you can discuss the process. Discussion is especially important for young children who are not familiar with the test. Ensure that they understand how the test will work, the rules and procedures and that it is okay not to know all the answers. Their job is to do their best and show you what they know.

Feed the Hobbits

Of course, we feed the children every day, but I am very intentional when I meal plan around testing time. A high-protein breakfast to get them going and keep them energized. I plan an easy lunch so that I don’t have to spend too much time on meal prep and take away from testing time. Finally, I plan a fun snack for the end of testing each day. These treats do not have to be complicated but provide something to look forward to at the end of the testing period. Since we test in the spring, I often use treats like ice cream or popsicles.

Celebrate

We like to celebrate the end of testing. Sometimes we take a fun field trip the day after testing, and other years we have planned a family campfire or other fun activity. This year we are keeping it simple with a movie night and homemade pizza when we finish our testing. Overall, I want them to have something positive to associate with the testing and celebrate the completion of the test and not just scores.

Scores are Tools

My final tip is to look at scores as one tool in an extensive toolbox. We chose to use the IOWA test because I felt like the results were specific enough to be helpful to me in my planning. When the scores come back in, my husband and I meet with each child independently and discuss their results. If there is a weak area, we discuss our plans to help them improve in that area. We do not treat the scores like a success or failure on their part, merely a gauge of what they know and what we still need to teach.

Also, we do not share their results with anyone else. They are free to tell grandparents or siblings how they did, but we do not share those scores. This allows them to feel more confident in knowing that they are not being judged on their scores.

If your family participates in standardized testing, I would love to know your tips and tricks to keep testing from being stressful and scary.

Resource Library and Affiliate Disclosure

When you sign up for the Schoolin’ Swag free resource library, you will get a link and password to the library. We are adding to the library each month with new items. You will also get a bi-weekly newsletter email to keep you up to date on what we have going on.

Resource Library 

This post may contain affiliate or referral links, including Amazon affiliate links. I will never recommend a product that I don’t believe in, and you will never be charged more for purchasing through our links. It does help pay for the costs associated with the blog.

Tuesday Tips: Relationships Over Academics

I only have to learn some lessons once, but this is one that I have to remind myself and use to help evaluate our schedule constantly.

Relationships are more important than academics! 

*Some links in this post are affiliate links, see disclosure below*

Some of you are shouting Amen, and others wonder if my children can read or if I threw out the textbooks. Hear me out; I am not saying that academics aren’t important or that we shouldn’t be teaching our children a wide variety of subjects. However, I do strive to put relationships first in our home.

When I think about relationships in this context, I think first of our relationship with God and second of our relationships with the family (marriage, parent/child, and sibling). 

Our relationships with others outside of our homes are also meaningful.

Relationship with God

Mark 8:36 says, “For how is a man benefited if he should gain the whole world and he should lose his soul?”

I do not believe that our relationship with God excludes academics; on the contrary, I think that he gave us minds to learn and grow. However, I think that my children’s relationship with God is ultimately far more important than their academics. That means that I try to prioritize our time in the Word, our time worshipping, and our time in discipleship.

It also means that if I see issues with a child’s relationship with God or struggling with sin, I do not mind putting the academics to the side while we deal with that. I try to keep eternity in mind when setting our priorities.

Family Relationships

I need you to know that I am preaching to myself as much as I am sharing with you on this one. When you are in the same house, doing school, meals, and all of life together, it can create close relationships. However, it can also create friction.

Marriage Relationships

It is vital to take the time to work on the relationships within your home. First, as a homeschool mom, it can be really easy for me to get wrapped up in homeschooling, house cleaning, and feeding the children who eat like hobbits.  

None of those are bad things, but if you are not careful, they can cause you to neglect your marriage. Sometimes you need to put away the lesson planner, turn off the computer, and focus on your spouse.

This might also look like stopping school in the middle of the day to take your husband something he forgot or help him with a project. Your children will benefit from seeing you prioritize your spouse.

Sibling Bumper Car Fun!

Sibling Relationships

This might just be at my house, but I think my children are far harder on each other than they are on people outside of our home. We struggle with raised voices, tense words, and unkind actions in our sibling relationships. While I do not think this is uncommon, I also believe it is essential that we take the time to address those issues.

For our family, that has meant stopping schoolwork to have family discussions or to help two children work through their issues. It has also meant adding in sibling Bible study to help them understand how God wants them to treat one another.

Other times, it means encouraging them to stop what they are doing to help out a sibling or to go and support them at an event.

Mother Son Bowling Fun!

Parent/Child Relationships

Last but not least are the parent/child relationships. Putting relationships first in this category means spending time together that does not revolve around school, and it might mean taking a day to hang out and have fun or taking the time to listen when they are having a tough day.

For us, it also meant getting an online program with tutoring for upper math. I love teaching my children and learning along with them. However, my son and I were constantly at odds over Algebra.

There were tears and harsh words, and it strained our relationship. After much discussion, we tried a different program for Geometry (Thinkwell) that had online tutoring. Having someone else help out with that one class was so worth the benefits to our relationship.

Relationships with Others

In addition to our family relationships, we need to think about our relationships with others. This might mean friends, neighbors, church family, the mailman, or anyone you come into contact with on a given day.

At this point, your teenagers might agree with me and use this as an excuse to hang out with their friends instead of doing math.

What Does That Look Like?

That is not what I am talking about, but it might look like taking the day off to sit with a friend whose parent is having surgery or supporting a friend going through a difficult time.

I am not saying that we should put aside academics for every social activity. However, we must remember it is okay to set aside academics for a day or a time to help others. A day spent with grandma will be remembered long after that history lesson. It is okay to take a break from math and help your neighbor get her heavy groceries put away.

Overall, academics are necessary but not as important as relationships. Relationships have a lifelong and sometimes eternal impact!  

Resource Library and Affiliate Disclosure

When you sign up for the Schoolin’ Swag free resource library you will get a link and password to the library, we are adding to the library each month with new items. You will also get a bi-weekly newsletter email to keep you up to date on what we have going on.

Resource Library 

This post may contain affiliate or referral links, including Amazon affiliate links. As always I will never recommend a product that I don’t believe in and you will never be charged more for purchasing through our links. It does help pay for the costs associated with the blog.

Deals and Freebies

If you have not tried SchoolhouseTeachers.com, you don’t want to miss this sale!

Journey Homeschool Academy is having their early bird sale! It is their best deal of the year and we love the high school science courses.

Tuesday Tip: Read Alouds and Legos are like Peanut Butter and Jelly

Read Alouds and Legos are like peanut butter and jelly; they just go together. (Full disclosure: I dislike peanut butter, but my kids love PB&J).

*Links contained in this post may be affiliate links, see disclosure below*

One of the questions or concerns that I often hear from the parents of young children is that their children have a hard time being still and focusing when they read aloud. Too often, the solution is to stop reading or spend the whole time stressed out about getting the little one to sit still.

Instead of being a fun learning experience, it becomes a stressful chore for both the mom and the child.

My Own Experience and Background

I had a habit, some might say a bad habit, of doodling in my notebooks when I was listening to a lecture in a class. Later in graduate school, I would eat dry Lucky Charms while listening to the professors.

I knew that I could eat and listen or doodle and listen, though I sometimes tried to break the habit. It was not until I was talking about it to one of my graduate professors that I realized it helped me focus. The professor said it did not bother her because she knew that it was keeping my hands busy so my mind could focus on what she was saying.

This concept really helped me better understand how my brain worked and has been super beneficial in allowing me to help both my public school students and now my own homeschooled children find ways to help them listen.

Why Legos?

Legos are great for working with while listening because they can be done quietly and without a lot of movement, and this keeps them from being distracting to the other children in the room.

We particularly like free building instead of kits for read-aloud time because it allows their brains to still focus on what they are hearing. Younger children can work with Duplo blocks.

As a bonus, Legos are great for helping with fine motor skills and creativity.

Are Legos the Only Option?

Legos are a great tool but just one of many great options for read-aloud time. My daughter often worked on her hat loom or colored pictures while I read aloud. Other students enjoy snack time as you read.

Any quiet activity that does not take too much mental focus can be great for read-aloud time.

Do All Students Need an Activity?

Some students can sit and listen to a read-aloud for long periods without any activity and may prefer to sit and listen.

Activities are particularly helpful for those like me and my son who have ADHD but can benefit many children who do not struggle with ADHD. It is all about what works best for the individual child.

Conclusions

If read-aloud time is going great in your home, do not feel the need to make changes. However, if you are disappointed with your read-aloud time and feel your children struggle to focus, do not be afraid to try Legos or another quiet activity.

These activities can also work well with audiobooks to get in even more great literature. Nothing fully replaces the example and bonding of having a parent read aloud, but audiobooks are an excellent way to supplement that and fit in all of the great books you want your children to enjoy.

Blog Posts with More Read-Aloud and Audio Book Resources

Remarkable Read Alouds

Tip Tuesday: Our Homeschool Secret Weapon-Audiobooks

Reading With Your Ears

Read-Aloud Family Book Study: Chapter 1

Resource Library and Affiliate Disclosure

When you sign up for the Schoolin’ Swag free resource library you will get a link and password to the library, we are adding to the library each month with new items. You will also get a bi-weekly newsletter email to keep you up to date on what we have going on.

Resource Library 

This post may contain affiliate or referral links, including Amazon affiliate links. As always I will never recommend a product that I don’t believe in and you will never be charged more for purchasing through our links. It does help pay for the costs associated with the blog.

Deals and Freebies

If you have not tried SchoolhouseTeachers.com, you don’t want to miss this sale!

Tuesday Tips: Do Not Underestimate the Value of Life Lessons in Your Homeschool

Academics are important, but they are not the most important skills we teach our children.

Some of you are nodding your heads, and others are ready to stop reading and call me crazy. No matter which side you are on, hear me out.

Academics are important, and in our home, we strive to make sure that our children have an education that will allow them to pursue whatever options God might be calling them to, which could include entering a four-year university.

However, academics are only third on my list of overarching goals for our homeschool.

  1. To teach my children about Jesus and help lead them to a saving relationship with Him.
  2. To give my children the skills they need to be independent and productive adults.
  3. To prepare them academically for whatever path God leads them to pursue.
Life Lessons in Your Homeschool

What Do You Mean Life Lessons?

In this context, when I say life lessons, I am speaking about learning life skills. This could include any number of skills. For example, cooking, cleaning, making phone calls, setting up appointments, and laundry.

In our home, it also includes our homestead tasks. My children learn to garden, care for their chickens, raise animals, and more. This teaches them skills needed to help provide for themselves and their families, responsibility, work ethic, and more.

Home and car maintenance and repair also fall under life lessons. Car maintenance might be as simple as teaching them to pump gas. I once had a dear friend who owned a car and made it to college without knowing how to pump her gas, which made things very challenging for her.

Life lessons can also include less tangible skills like visiting those who are grieving or sick and sending cards to people who are lonely or going through a tough time.

There have been times when we have been going through difficult family times, and we rarely opened our textbooks. When my grandfather was dying from cancer, and we spent as much time as possible with him, when our town flooded and we focused on hurricane relief work, and the weeks right after our youngest children were born. However, my children learned life lessons far more valuable than we find in textbooks in those times.

How Do You Teach Life Lessons in Your Homeschool?

Sometimes when I hear people talking about something else I need to teach my children, I start stressing about adding another curriculum or one more thing to our daily to-do list.

However, you do not necessarily have to plan life lessons in your homeschool, you certainly do not need a curriculum, and they will lighten your load over time.

Include your children in your day-to-day activities. Have them help you in the kitchen, fold clothes, start the laundry, gather the eggs, or whatever other chores are required. 

Over time, they will do the tasks more and more independently, which benefits them and your home because you do not have to do it all.

As you help those around you or deal with challenging situations, make sure to include them. This will look different for different children and different ages, but children learn so much through being involved.

Resources For Life Lessons in Your Homeschool

If you want a curriculum to help you be more intentional about life lessons in your homeschool, SchoolhouseTeachers.com (aff) has some great electives for home economics, money management, cooking, homesteading, and other life skills.

Do not underestimate the power of simply living life with your children and including them in daily tasks. They will learn skills that will benefit them throughout their lives.

Resource Library and Affiliate Disclosure

When you sign up for the Schoolin’ Swag free resource library you will get a link and password to the library, we are adding to the library each month with new items. You will also get a bi-weekly newsletter email to keep you up to date on what we have going on.

Resource Library 

This post may contain affiliate or referral links, including Amazon affiliate links. As always I will never recommend a product that I don’t believe in and you will never be charged more for purchasing through our links. It does help pay for the costs associated with the blog.